Letter to Graduate Students 2 | Salary Negotiations

 

Dear Dr. You,

I know you must be super stressed with your job search. I wish I could tell you that job hunting is easy. But, it’s not. It took me 100+ job applications and 4 months before I found mine. Sadly, this is a true representation of the average PhD’s job hunt. Even post-docs have it rough. A post-doc friend applied to 100+ faculty and industry positions, and only got 1 offer.

But, I’ll give you some hope. I have a friend who landed a job after his first on-campus interview. He’s a pretty wow engineer. Maybe, if the stars are aligned in your favor and you are pretty wow, then you’ll get a job after your first interview too.

Dear Dr. You
Fast forward to getting the job offer. How do you know what your salary should be?

Here are four great websites to help you:

1. GlassDoor is my personal favorite.

  • You can search by job title, geographic location and company name.
  • Average salaries are displayed in a simple horizontal bar chat.
  • Current and former employees review company culture and work-life balance.

2. Salary.com

  • You can search by job title and geographic location.
  • Average salaries are displayed in a bell curve.
  • A benefits tab summarizes the typical compensation package offered to someone with your job title.

3. CareerOneStop

  • You can search by job title and geographic location.
  • Average salaries are displayed in a horizontal bar chart.
  • A Cost of Living calculator (use the free demo) helps you determine if your monthly salary is enough to pay all your bills, student loans and still leave you enough dollars to save.

4. MyPlan

  • You can search by job title and geographic location.
  • Average salaries are displayed in a tabular format, indicating percentile distributions.

 

Best of luck to you as you start your job search! You got this! Let me know if these websites were helpful to you, and if there are websites that are even better than Glassdoor.com.

Cheers,

 

Bella A.

Advertisements